Quick Breads with a Twist

Kelly Newlon: founder/chef of Real Athlete Diets (RAD Boulder) Lifelong runner, lover of giant dogs and the mountains. Stephanie Howe: PhD in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from Oregon State University. Stephanie owns her own Nutrition & Coaching business where she works with individuals of varied background on how to best eat for their specific goals. Stephanie’s doctoral research focused on the role of appetite hormones in elite female runners before and after different exercise intensities. Stephanie has been sponsored by The North Face since 2010 and by Clif Bar since 2012.

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Is there anything better than coming in from a brisk morning run to a kitchen filled with the sweet smell of pumpkin bread baking in the oven? We think not.

Keeping a loaf or pumpkin muffins in the freezer provides easy access to training and racing fuel. The soft, easy to swallow texture makes it almost enjoyable to eat when you least want to put calories in during a race, after a hard workout or simply in daily life.

Quick breads not only taste great but are also full of exceptional health benefits. 

Stephanie recommends trying these easy tricks to push the benefits even further. 

Substitute water with an alternative liquid such as nut milks, oat milk or coconut milk. This adds a greater source of protein and fat. 

Add a mix of seeds on top for a great crunchy texture and to add micronutrients, such as iron, zinc, magnesium, and potassium. 

Using blackstrap molasses for extra iron and orange juice for extra flavor and to enhance the absorption of minerals, particularly iron. This recipe is a powerhouse of endless benefits and tastes great!

And don’t forget, pumpkin can easily be substituted with roasted mashed sweet potato or any of your favorite hard squash. Fall produce is exceptional and screaming to be baked with. If the product is cooked until soft (roasting works best) and mashed to a similar texture as canned pumpkin, you are good to go. Purple sweet potatoes (ube) make an exceptional alternative and are full of antioxidants. Our point here is to get creative and have fun cooking!

The following is an easy to make recipe for pumpkin bread.

Pumpkin Bread

 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

  2 large eggs (sub with ¼ cup of Just Egg for vegans)

  1 cup canned pumpkin

  1/2 cup oil (canola or olive oil work great)

  1/2 cup water, oat milk, nut milk or coconut milk

  2 tablespoons orange juice

  ¾ cup mix of seeds (we use a chia, sunflower, pumpkin and hemp combo)

  1-2/3 cups all-purpose flour 

  1-1/4 cups sugar

  ¼ cup blackstrap molasses

  1 teaspoon baking soda

  1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

  3/4 teaspoon salt

  1/2 teaspoon baking powder

  1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°. 
  2. Whisk together eggs, pumpkin, oil, molasses and liquid. Add dry ingredients and mix until just combined. Over mixing may cause a rubbery tough bread.
  3. Pour into a greased 9×5-in. loaf pan or lined muffin pan.
  4. Garnish top with seeds or oats if desired.
  5. Bake until the top is firm and set. The clean toothpick test is also a good judge. 65-70 minutes. 15-20 minutes for muffins. Cool in pan for 10 minutes before removing to a wire rack.
  6. Enjoy now or freeze for up to two months.

About the Author

Kelly Newlon: founder/chef of Real Athlete Diets (RAD Boulder) Lifelong runner, lover of giant dogs and the mountains. Stephanie Howe: PhD in Nutrition & Exercise Physiology from Oregon State University. Stephanie owns her own Nutrition & Coaching business where she works with individuals of varied background on how to best eat for their specific goals. Stephanie’s doctoral research focused on the role of appetite hormones in elite female runners before and after different exercise intensities. Stephanie has been sponsored by The North Face since 2010 and by Clif Bar since 2012.

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Comments

2 Responses

  1. This looks so good! When it says “add dry ingredients” does that also include the seeds mix? Or are seeds just for the top?

    Thanks!

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